Research findings

Pause to reflect for better results

01 Jun, 2020 PR planning, strategy, budgeting, Project management, Research findings

Pausing to reflect during a project may seem to slow down progress, but research shows it pays. Very few companies give their employees time for reflection, especially when competitive pressures are escalating. Usually the imperative is to work harder. The communication/public relations role is a classic example of a role always under time pressure. However, you will invariably find you are more productive when you pause to reflect for better results.

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Are we communicators or public relations practitioners?

01 Jun, 2020 Commentary, Communication trends, Research findings

The most detailed study of its kind undertaken has confirmed that people shrink from using ‘public relations’ in their job title. Analysis of all the member records of the Public Relations Institute of Australia (PRIA) in 2009 found that only 6.4% of members used ‘public relations’ in their job title. The most common term in member job titles, used by 28% of members, was ‘communication’ or ‘communications.’ And yet 'communicator' tends to imply low-level ...

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Soft skills of good communication and relationships essential to career success

01 Jun, 2020 Careers, Commentary, Research findings, Staff recruitment, Workplace relationships

After intensive internal research, Google’s top management were shocked to realize that soft, general skills ranked ahead of STEM and tech skills for achieving stronger organizational performance. Studies by management consultants confirmed the findings. Find out in this article the key soft skills to strengthen in your work, and how you can learn the skills.

 

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A useful ratio for giving praise

01 Jun, 2020 Employee coaching, performance development, Employee engagement, experience, satisfaction, Employee recognition, Employee, manager feedback, Leadership role, Research findings, Workplace relationships

Positive psychology experts are finding that the frequency of small, positive acts is crucial in business and personal relationships. Psychologist John Gottman, author of several books on relationships, pioneered research on marriage, which suggested there is a ‘magic ratio’ of 5 to 1 in the effectiveness of positive and negative interactions. Prof. Gottman (photo at right) found that marriages are more likely to succeed when the couple’s interactions are near a 5 to 1 ...

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