A formula for winning more executive approvals of your strategies

One of the crucial tests of a communicator is winning the approval for a high-level recommended strategy, whether it relates to communication or more general management issues. A bullet proof way to present a strategy to top decision makers is to work to the following formula that Jim Lukaszewski, one of the most experienced US PR consultants says is proven in use.

The persuasive formula for winning executive approval of your strategies

Prepare, and if necessary, present, a document with the following format:

  • Situation. A brief description of the nature of the issue, problem or situation that requires decision, action or study.
  • The goal. A clear, concise statement of the task to be accomplished, or the target to be reached, and why.
  • Analysis/assumptions. A brief description of what the situation means, its implications and the assumptions central to the analysis. Managers always need to know why, but not in great detail.
  • Options. Always provide at least three response options for the situation as presented and analyzed – preferably four options to limit the number of times a middle option may be chosen merely on the basis that it is the middle ground. If there is only one recommendation, which is questioned, it will most likely die and the discussion will move out of your control. The ‘do nothing’ option should be included in every strategy. The optimal choice should be recommended and the fallback recommendations should be supportable. Be prepared to do something in between the things that have been recommended.
  • Recommendation. The recommendation is obviously based on the line of action that has the strongest case. At the same time, be prepared to explain the reasoning behind the recommended action with an analysis of each of the other options.
  • Unintended consequences. These are the reactions or circumstances that could arise from suggested options or by doing nothing. Inadequate provision for consequences (risk management) can sabotage an otherwise useful strategy

This is a structured approach leading to productive, focused planning. If you use it, you will be able to put robust recommendations for important strategies for decision making at the highest level.

Photo by Randy Fath on Unsplash.

Kim Harrison

Kim J. Harrison has authored, edited, coordinated, produced and published the material in the articles and ebooks on this website. He brings his experience in professional communication and business management to provide helpful insights to readers around the world. As he has progressed through his wide-ranging career, his roles have included corporate affairs management; PR consulting; authoring many articles, books and ebooks; running a university PR course; and business management. Kim has received several international media relations awards and a website award. He has been quoted in The New York Times and various other news media, and has held elected positions with his State and National PR Institutes.

Content Authenticity Statement. AI is not knowingly used in the writing or editing of any content, including images, in these newsletters, articles or ebooks. If AI-produced content is contained in any published form in future, this will be reported to readers.

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